Why you need to get along with your child’s other parent

Why you need to get along with your child’s other parent

| Jun 25, 2021 | Blog, Family Law |

In the state of Louisiana, both parents are generally allowed to have access to their children after a divorce. Therefore, it’s critical that you develop a good working relationship with your former spouse so that you can successfully raise your son or daughter together. In some cases, an inability to work with your child’s other parent could jeopardize your ability to obtain custody of your child.

You’re supposed to do whatever is in your child’s best interest

Your child doesn’t deserve to hear his or her parents arguing about how inconvenient a visitation or custody schedule is. Furthermore, your son or daughter doesn’t need to know how you feel about the fact that you have supervised visitation until a domestic abuse allegation can be investigated. If you have any issues that need to be resolved, you should address them directly with the child’s other parent. Alternatively, those concerns can be raised with an attorney with experience with family law cases, who may figure out a way to resolve them amicably.

Plans will inevitably change

Raising a child can be frustrating, partially because you can’t predict when an illness, injury or another incident will make it impossible to stick to a custody or visitation schedule. Furthermore, there is a chance that your son or daughter will forget to mention that the school play, soccer practice or some other event was rescheduled.

Having a quality working relationship with your former partner will make it easier to handle the unexpected without experiencing a lot of anger or stress. If you suspect that your child’s other parent is willfully failing to abide by the terms of a parenting plan, you should promptly speak to your attorney.

It’s almost always in your best interest to get along with your ex-spouse after a divorce if you share children with that person. Your attorney may be able to suggest various strategies to ensure that you can effectively raise your child even if you don’t get along with his or her other parent.