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Posts tagged "child support"

What does Louisiana say about child support?

Most Louisiana parents know that they must support their children financially at least until they reach the age of 18. This child support requirement remains whether the parents are married, divorced or separated. Even if the parents were unmarried, the state expects each parent to provide financially for the children.

Fathers can seek child support modifications if needed

For parents in Louisiana and elsewhere, child support can be a rather contentious topic. Yes, it is important to make sure your children receive all that they need, but determining how much economic support is actually required to accomplish this can be a challenge.

Do unwed Louisiana fathers really need a paternity test?

Having a child -- whether married or not -- is typically a joyous occasion in the lives of parents. Many Louisiana parents love to show off their new family additions and are proud to claim them. However, for unwed fathers, simply saying they are the father is not enough to enforce the legal rights that go along with having a child. This makes establishing paternity a must for fathers, but also for their children.

Determining a fair amount for child support in Louisiana

The end of a marriage is generally a stressful and challenging period for everyone involved. For couples who have children together, the process is often complex. Child support and custody are some of the tougher areas of divorce in Louisiana, and these can have a major impact on the future. A parent who is facing a similar situation may have a great deal to consider while attempting to make decisions that are in the best interest of the children.

Fathers' rights for unmarried dads

In the past 10 years, the number of unwed fathers has jumped over 20 percent. Unfortunately, many of those fathers are not an influential part of their children's lives. Parenting experts believe this may be because unwed men are not aware of their fathers' rights and responsibilities. These advocates feel that fathers would participate more fully in their children's lives if they knew how.

Changes in families brings changes in child support expectations

Louisiana courts have seen interesting changes in family law over the past few years. Some decades-old provisions that were taken for granted are now becoming less mainstream. Mothers having careers and fathers taking more active roles in raising children have led many to reconsider common issues like child support and alimony. More often, divorce settlements do not include those items.

Fathers still seeking fair child custody arrangements

Advocates for fathers' rights say they have seen significant improvements in divorces involving children. In the past 20 years, child custody cases have become more focused on the best interests of the child, and many parents are willing to set aside their differences and work for that goal. However, studies show that many divorced dads are still fighting for regular, adequate contact with their children. While the situation may be improving, some feel there are still too many disadvantages that keep fathers in Louisiana separated from their children.

Adjusting child support: Avoiding nonpayment

Especially in the early process of divorce, the proceedings can be difficult and downtime abundant. When the courts create a temporary custody and support arrangement, there can often be flaws in how the plan is arranged, which can lead to an unfair burden for the noncustodial parent. If you are worried about what your potential child support payments will be, or if you are already struggling with a burdensome amount of child support, consulting with an experienced attorney is the best way to set things right.

New child support rule may benefit incarcerated parents

When a person is in jail in Louisiana, he or she has few resources to pay debts. In 2010, a study showed that over 50 percent of those incarcerated in federal prisons while ordered to make child support payments were behind in their obligations. That number has likely risen in the past six years. The average amount of child support debt among inmates is $24,000. While the current administration prepares to leave office, there is hope that something will be done to alleviate this burden for some prisoners.

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