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If you and your fiancee or spouse want to avoid divorce

If you are either happily engaged or married, you may be surprised at how often you worry about the possibility of divorce. This is a normal concern. No matter how wonderful things may be now, the unexpected may lead you and your romantic partner to grow apart. However, the fact that this worry is normal does not make it easy to stomach. Thankfully, there are things you can do to ease your concerns.

For better and for worse, there is really no way to make a marriage “divorce-proof.” Yet, there are things that couples can do to lessen the likelihood that they will grow apart in unhealthy and/or unhappy ways.

Although this first tip may seem counterintuitive, it is important to understand that drafting either a prenuptial agreement or postnuptial agreement may strengthen your bond and prevent unhealthy tensions from simmering. Encouraging each other to talk through your concerns about finances and other relevant issues proactively can aid you both in avoiding unhealthy habits. This kind of proactive discussion can also ground expectations in mutual understanding.

In addition, it is important to remember that just as you will change and grow over time, your romantic partner will change and grow as well. By processing your worries and concerns related to your relationship in healthy ways, you may ultimately allow yourself and your partner freedom to grow without undue fear.

Finally, it may benefit you to speak to a counselor and an attorney about your concerns. Sometimes, there are relatively easy solutions to your concerns that professionals can help you to access.

Source: The Huffington Post, “No, You Can't Divorce-Proof Your Marriage (But Here's What You Can Do Instead),” Brittany Wong, June 30, 2015

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