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Looking on the bright side of living alone again

We frequently write about how important it is to take excellent care of yourself during your divorce. No one can completely separate the hurt feelings and emotional wounds one sustains as a marriage is ending from the practical process of divorce. However, taking good care of yourself places you in the best possible position to weather the divorce process with grace, with dignity and with an eye towards the future instead of the past. This approach helps to ensure that negative emotions do not rule the process and imperil your ability to obtain a fair divorce settlement.

It is not always easy to take good care of yourself during the divorce process or in its wake. You may feel exhausted and overwhelmed much of the time. However, there are realities which accompany divorce that oddly make it a bit easier to take care of yourself. For example, you no longer have to worry about taking care of your spouse. Your needs, and the needs of your children if you have children, can come first each and every day.

In addition, living alone can make it easier to take care of yourself for one simple reason: You can control your environment without your spouse’s influence. If you want to play soothing music over the speakers in your bedroom, you can. If it makes you feel a little better to drink straight out of the orange juice carton, you can. If you want to take a shower for 40 minutes straight, you can.

Living alone during and after a divorce can be a lonely and frustrating experience at times. However, there are benefits associated with this situation if you are willing to see them and choose to embrace them.

Source: The Huffington Post, “16 Undeniably Great Things About Living Alone Again After A Split,” Brittany Wong, Oct. 2, 2014

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